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APCC13

APCC13

The 13th Australasian Plant Conservation Conference is to be held in Albury, NSW from Sunday 3 – Thursday 7 April 2022. This is the premier event in Australia to discuss native plant conservation issues. The overall theme is ‘Seeds to recovery’. The call for abstracts is currently open. We are seeking abstracts for both presentations and posters which fit within one of the 4 sub-themes:

  1. Seeds
  2. Bushfire recovery
  3. Conservation/threatened species and communities
  4. Engaging people with conservation & restoration

We are also seeking abstracts for shorter presentations (5 – 10mins TBC) on three workshop topics.Please visit our conference website to download the submission form. Abstract submission closes 4 February 2022.

Notice of ANPC Annual General Meeting 2021

Notice of ANPC Annual General Meeting 2021

The Annual General Meeting of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation Inc. (ANPC) will be held on Wednesday 17 November 2021, from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm (Australian Eastern Daylight Saving Time) via Zoom. All current ANPC members are encouraged to attend in a voting capacity to ensure we reach a quorum, and to hear about what the ANPC has achieved over the last year. This includes individual members and representatives of organisational members. Please RSVP to the Secretary by Wednesday 10 November 2021 and then you will receive the Zoom link. To check your membership status, please contact the office.

Do you want to help make a difference to plant conservation in Australia? Nominations are now open for the following positions on the ANPC Inc. Committee of Management: President; Vice-President; Secretary and 5 ordinary members. Download the Committee Nomination Form here. Nominations must be received by the Secretary by close of business on Wednesday 10 November 2021.

Image by Amelia Martyn Yenson

Germplasm Guidelines Launched!

Germplasm Guidelines Launched!

ANPC is proud to announce the launch of the new Germplasm Guidelines, described by one contributor as “one of the most useful and practical tools for the uncertain years ahead of us”. We thank the many contributors who wrote chapters or one of the fifty case studies in this edition and others who provided peer review during the process. Plant material – germplasm – is stored in Australia’s conservation seed banks, as living collections in botanic gardens, tiny shoots in tissue culture, and even as cryo-stored seeds ready to be reinvigorated many years after storage. These guidelines showcase the latest techniques, literature and procedures for optimising germplasm storage and use. With plenty of infographics, illustrations and photos, these guidelines are necessary but enjoyable reading for staff within conservation agencies, scientists, nursery staff, students, volunteers, and anyone interested in applied plant biology. The Germplasm Guidelines are available for free download: https://www.anpc.asn.au/plant-germplasm/

Germplasm video series

Germplasm video series

In case you missed it! Want to know why the Germplasm Guidelines were updated and what is included in this third edition? Keen to hear what the contributors think about when they’re not writing, researching and growing plants? Check out the Plant Germplasm Conservation playlist on the updated ANPC YouTube channel.

Fire and Rust reports released

Fire and Rust reports released

Extensive surveys assessing the impact of Myrtle rust (Austropuccinia psidii) were conducted following the 2019/20 wildfires. The two reports are now available for download from our website and make for sobering reading. Myrtle rust symptoms and damage were found in all survey sites in fire-affected areas of south-east Queensland and NSW south to the Central coast region. New host species have been identified including Leptospermum speciosum (Showy tea tree), Eucalyptus pyrocarpa (Large-fruited blackbutt) and Eucalyptus amplifolia subsp. amplifolia (Cabbage gum). Significant impacts were identified on the endangered Rhodamnia rubescens (Scrub turpentine) and Uromyrtus australis (Peach myrtle). Myrtle rust symptoms have been observed for the first time on Eucalyptus pilularis (Blackbutt) and Syncarpia hillii (Satinay) on World Heritage K’gari (Fraser Island). Regeneration of Melaleuca quinquenervia (Broad-leaved paperbark), particularly in New South Wales, is of concern with the loss of established trees, and only 15 to 35% of seedlings showing evidence of resistance. Melaleuca nodosa (Prickly-leaved paperbark) is highly susceptible to Myrtle rust with only small numbers of trees showing resistance/tolerance to the disease. Longer-term monitoring of all sites is required to understand the impacts of Myrtle rust on Myrtaceae regenerating after wildfire. The ANPC would like to thank the Threatened Species Recovery Hub for funding this project.