Select Page
APCC13 update

APCC13 update

We’d like to thank everyone who attended the 13th Australasian Plant Conservation Conference earlier this month. We had 94 people join us in Albury and 56 online attendees. We’ve heard some great feedback so far that delegates enjoyed the presentation topics, had some great discussions and found the in-person networking really valuable. Our Conference Evaluation Survey is still open, send us your conference feedback so we can continue making events which suit our community’s needs.

Recordings from the Conference will be made available to delegates next week, keep an eye on your inbox for the access password. For those who did not attend the conference but would like to purchase access to the recordings you can do so at our website, more details coming soon.

‘Plants Going Places’ Victorian Translocation Symposium

‘Plants Going Places’ Victorian Translocation Symposium

Due to the ongoing uncertainty surrounding face-to-face events, the three threatened plant workshops originally planned to be held in Melbourne, Ballarat and Bairnsdale this year are now going to be held as one online event. Chantelle Doyle, who produced the three Plants Going Places videos for the ANPC, will be coordinating and facilitating the workshop and we would like to welcome her to the team. Chantelle is currently completing a PhD focused on practitioner experiences of threatened plant translocation and produces the accompanying website (plant-heroes.com) which shares some of those practitioner stories. Chantelle has also planned and undertaken translocations of the Sydney Basin endemic, Julian’s Hibbertia (Hibbertia spanantha)

We will be sharing more details on the workshop shortly so keep an eye on our newsletter and social media channels for more information.

If you have translocation experience to share and would like to contribute to the workshop please email Chantelle Doyle at translocation@anpc.asn.au

https://www.anpc.asn.au/plants-going-places/

Plant Treasures webinar recording

Plant Treasures webinar recording

The latest webinar in our series ‘Plant treasures – in conversation’ was held on Thursday 12 May 2022. This special extended webinar focused on ‘The role of the nursery and living collections in conserving native plant species’ while highlighting current practice and future needs. You can watch the recording on our YouTube channel here.

The webinar was opened by the Germplasm Guidelines project manager, Amelia Martyn Yenson. John Arnott (Curator of horticulture at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria and BGANZ Council Representative for Victoria) then gave a theme introduction before the following presentations and videos:

  • VIDEO: The role of the plant nursery and living collections in ex situ conservation (John Arnott & Warren Worboys)
  • Overview of the Germplasm Guidelines (Dr Amelia Martyn Yenson)
  • VIDEO: Cutting propagation in the conservation nursery (Mandy Thomson)
  • Trials, Tribulations & Triumphs in Managing a Botanic Gardens Seed Orchard (Lorraine Perrins)
  • The role of the ANBG nursery and living collections in plant conservation (Dr Zoe Knapp)
  • VIDEO: Collection, processing and storage of fern spores (Tom North)
  • Biosecurity considerations in living collections (Amanda Shade)
  • What we can learn from conservation of crop wild relatives? (Dr Sally Norton)
  • VIDEO: Using ex situ collections of Australian native species: Translocation and other end uses (Dr Emma Dalziell, Dr Leonie Monks and Dr Andrew Crawford)

The webinar was concluded with a panel discussion facilitated by Michael Elgey (Curator Manager, The Australian Botanic garden mount Annan and BGANZ Council Representative for NSW).

This series is a collaborative project between the ANPC and BGANZ Collections and Records Management Group and is funded by a grant from The Ian Potter Foundation.

New ANPC grant announced!

New ANPC grant announced!

 The ANPC is excited to announce that we have just received a new Environment Restoration Fund – Threatened Species Strategy Action Plan Grant. Entitled “Enabling future recovery of Rhodomyrtus psidioides by safe custody ex situ” the ANPC will be working with various state government departments and botanic gardens over the next 13 months to undertake a Myrtle rust pilot dispersed-custody model to enable sampling and repropagation of surviving wild germplasm, including genetic management program. R. psidioides faces extinction in the wild due to Myrtle Rust, and survivors do not set fruit. Seeds are unorthodox, and ex situ germplasm must be kept as whole-plant collections (pending tissue culture, feasibility uncertain), and dispersed for safety. A large genebank is essential for screening for rust resistance genes, and for eventual ecologically safe reintroduction.