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Yes, native plants can flourish after bushfire. But there’s only so much hardship they can take – The Conversation, 17 January 2020

Yes, native plants can flourish after bushfire. But there’s only so much hardship they can take – The Conversation, 17 January 2020

ANPC Project Manager Lucy Commander and APC Editor Heidi Zimmer on restoration following bushfires. In a fire-blackened landscape, signs of life are everywhere. A riot of red and green leaves erupt from an otherwise dead-looking tree trunk, and the beginnings of wildflowers and grasses peek from the crunchy charcoal below. Much Australian flora has evolved to cope with fire, recovering by re-sprouting or setting seed. However, some plants are sensitive to fire, especially when fires are frequent or intense, and these species need our help to recover. Encouraging native flora to bounce back from these unprecedented fires requires targeted funding and actions to conserve and restore plants and ecological communities, including seed banking. Read more.

After the fire: can our plants bounce back? Canberra Times, 19 January 2020

After the fire: can our plants bounce back? Canberra Times, 19 January 2020

Green shoots can already be seen among the black scorched earth, but experts are cautious about just how well Australia’s landscapes will regenerate after the fires that have ripped through millions of hectares across the country. There is also division on what humans could or should do to assist ecosystems as they recover in a period of drought and climate change. Fire is not always a negative for Australia’s landscapes…But the strain put on many areas of Australia’s ecosystems by prolonged drought, and repeated fires, mean experts say just how parts of the bush will regenerate are yet to be seen….Action also needs to be taken to prevent invasive plants and feral animals like rabbits, goats and horses from impeding recovery, says Lucy Commander, project manager at the Australian Network for Plant Conservation. Dr Commander has also called for the government’s $50 million fund for wildlife and plant recovery to be spent strategically, instead of rushing in. Read more.

ANPC’s ‘Plant Germplasm Conservation in Australia’ guidelines to be reviewed over next 2 years!

ANPC’s ‘Plant Germplasm Conservation in Australia’ guidelines to be reviewed over next 2 years!

The ANPC is extremely excited to announce that we have received an Environment and Conservation grant from The Ian Potter Foundation to review and update the ANPC’s Germplasm Guidelines. Called ‘Conserving our national plant treasures: guidelines for collecting, storing and growing Australian plants for restoration’, this project will fund the comprehensive update of one of our flagship publications. The Germplasm Guidelines are the definitive Australian standard for native seed and regenerative plant material collection, storage and use, last being published in 2009. Since that time, seed biology research has progressed significantly and to ensure that the latest information is passed onto practitioners and land managers, we will bring together leading experts in seed biology research and practice from across Australia to review and rewrite the Guidelines. The project will incorporate updated scientific knowledge to ensure Australia’s seed sector maintains the necessary skills and knowledge required. Read more.

Healthy Seeds project update

Healthy Seeds project update

The Healthy Seeds Consortium of partners from across the native seed and ecological restoration sectors has been established between the ANPC and the Centre for Australian National Biodiversity ResearchRoyal Botanic Gardens SydneyDepartment of Planning, Industry and EnvironmentAustralian Seed Bank PartnershipGreening AustraliaAustralian Association of Bush Regenerators and the Society Ecological Restoration Australasia, to oversee the project and has held its first meeting. Martin Driver and Lucy Commander commenced in September as the Healthy Seeds Project Manager and Florabank Guidelines Project Manager respectively, and have hit the ground running. And Murray Local Land Services is about to start the audit and investigation into past and present Seed Production Areas (SPAs) in NSW. SPAs are seen as central to overcoming shortfalls in high quality native seed for ecological restoration, and for improving seed supply reliability, reducing pressure on wild populations, and for improving genetic provenance and diversity to ensure the long-term health and resilience of restored ecosystems. Read more.