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Film Release: Myrtle Rust – the silent killer

Film Release: Myrtle Rust – the silent killer

A new film released this month shares first-hand stories on myrtle rust from indigenous rangers, scientists and landowners. Learn how our precious species and landscapes are under threat and the conservation actions we can take to save them. Watch it here.

This film was a collaborative project led by Queensland Agriculture with support from the Australian Network for Plant Conservation, San Diego Zoo, NSW Government, Butchulla Aboriginal Corporation, and the Plant Biosecurity Science Foundation.

ANPC membership renewals for 2023

ANPC membership renewals for 2023

You may have seen our email this week that membership renewals are due. Memberships run for the calendar year so if you purchased a one-year membership it will expire on 31 December 2022. Please refer to the email for payment options or visit the memberships page on our website.

ANPC Members receive a subscription to our quarterly bulletin Australasian Plant Conservation, discounts to ANPC workshops, conferences and forums, and a 10% discount on gift memberships. We also have a direct debit function available to automatically keep your membership current – just tick the Auto Renewal box on the membership form and we’ll do the work for you!

 

Image: Amelia Martyn Yenson

Sneak Peek – Native Guava filming

Sneak Peek – Native Guava filming

Filming has begun for our upcoming video on the ‘safe custody for Native Guava’ project. This scene was captured at one of our project partner sites, the Lismore Rainforest Botanic Gardens in northern NSW. This project is supported by funding from the Australian Government. Image by Chantelle Doyle

ANPC Donation Drive – Will you help us in the fight against Myrtle Rust?

ANPC Donation Drive – Will you help us in the fight against Myrtle Rust?

From Nov 2022 – April 2023 we are raising funds for our work on Myrtle Rust. Myrtle Rust infects hundreds of species in the Myrtaceae family, which includes our bottlebrushes, paperbarks, lilly pillies, and eucalypts. Since this disease was introduced to Australia in 2010, 5 native plants have jumped straight to the ‘Critically Endangered’ category as a direct result of the disease, and are faced with extinction in the wild in the very near future. A further 20 – 30 Australian native species are known, or suspected, to also be in decline, and over 300 more are known to be susceptible to a lesser degree. This number will rise.

We are raising funds to:

  • Further develop the Myrtle Rust information hub on our website to provide even more up-to-date, scientifically accurate information and images of the disease and the species affected by it.
  • Continue to identify relevant global research and information and bring this to the heart of decision making about Myrtle Rust in Australia.
  • Share our evidence-based resources with the wider conservation community.
  • Continue to work across the silos that divide the people and resources needed for an integrated national response to the disease.
  • Promote the National Action Plan for Myrtle Rust, and lobby for the new resources that will be needed by botanic gardens and agencies to implement it.
  • Promote improved environmental biosecurity measures for this and future environmental plant diseases.

Please help us take our fight against Myrtle Rust to the next level and donate now. Our Myrtle Rust team are happy to discuss our work with prospective donors. Please contact us at myrtlerust@anpc.asn.au

Image below: Dead Native Guava trees at Bongil Bongil National Park, NSW, 2013, only three years after the arrival of Myrtle Rust. In recent surveys in NSW and QLD, no adult trees remain of this once common rainforest plant. Credit Peter Entwistle

Project Update – Planting out

Project Update – Planting out

This spring, partners in our collaborative project to secure Safe Custody for Native Guava received the first plants to add to their living collections. Five advanced Rhodomyrtus psidioides plants were sent from the Australian Botanic Garden Mount Annan to Lismore Rainforest Botanic Garden (NSW), the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mount Tomah (NSW), the Australian National Botanic Garden (ACT), and Dandenong Ranges Botanic Garden (Victoria). Plants were also added to the existing collection of these species at the Australian Botanic Garden Mount Annan.

Action to conserve Native Guava was rated as an emergency priority in the Myrtle Rust in Australia National Action Plan. Our current collaborative project helps meet the Germplasm Capture objective which is a very high priority in the NAP. This pilot project aims to show what is possible with collaborative action on germplasm capture. We also aim to understand the workflow and take any learnings into similar future ex situ conservation projects on emergency priority species.This project received grant funding from the Australian Government.

Image: Dr Zoe Knapp and Toby Golson with critically endangered Rhodomyrtus psidioides (Native Guava) planted at the Australian National Botanic Garden. Credit: Amelia Martyn Yenson.

ANPC Annual General Meeting

ANPC Annual General Meeting

We held our Annual General Meeting on Wednesday 16 November 2022 over Zoom and in person at the Australian National Botanic Gardens. Our president, Tony Auld, presented his President’s Report which can be read here. We said thank you and farewell to our committee member Meredith Cosgrove who has finished her term and welcomed back Linda Broadhurst, Andrew Fairney, Melissa Millar, Leonie Monks and Singarayer Florentine who renominated for another 2 years as Ordinary Members of the ANPC Management Committee.

Dr Geoff Pegg, our guest speaker, gave an insightful talk on the results of the Fire and Rust project which looked at the impact of myrtle rust on post fire regeneration. You can watch his presentation here. We also had time at the conclusion of the meeting to play the new film ‘Myrtle Rust – the silent killer’.