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Restoration Seed Ecology with Dr Lucy Commander – Steam Powered

Restoration Seed Ecology with Dr Lucy Commander – Steam Powered

New interview with Dr Lucy Commander (tw: @lucy_commander), a restoration seed ecologist who has spent over a decade undertaking scientific research with the mining industry to improve mine restoration. Lucy was also the lead editor of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation’s Guidelines for the Translocation of Threatened Plants, published in 2018, and is currently Project Manager for the update of the Florabank Guidelines for best practice native seed collection and use, with Australian Network for Plant Conservation and partners. In this conversation, Lucy talks about her interest in singing and gardening, restoration seed ecology, and her work as an editor on the Florabank Guidelines for best practice native seed collection and use. Watch here.

New project! Fire and Rust – Assessing the impact of Myrtle rust on fire regeneration

New project! Fire and Rust – Assessing the impact of Myrtle rust on fire regeneration

This project, funded by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub, aims to determine the susceptibility and impact of the rust fungus Myrtle rust (Austropuccinia psidii) on Myrtaceae species regenerating after the 2019/20 bushfires. In cooperation with the Department of Agriculture & Fisheries Queensland and the NSW Department of Primary Industries, surveys will be conducted across a wide range of ecosystems and species in the fire affected regions of NSW and Queensland, including reserves in the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage area. While fire is considered an important selection agent in the development of Australia’s native flora, the growth of new epicormic shoots and young seedlings en-masse are ideal for the development and spread of Myrtle rust. The project will identify the species showing susceptibility and the regeneration forms (re-shoots/seedlings) affected by the rust. The effect of repeated infection on species recovery/survival will be determined for species highlighted in priority lists, including bushfire affected threatened plants.

Podcast: Farming wildflowers; the future of restoration and native seed

Podcast: Farming wildflowers; the future of restoration and native seed

Let’s learn how to better restore our landscapes using native seeds. Listen to ANPC Committee member and one of the authors the ANPC’s recently published Australian Native Seed Survey Report, Dr Paul Gibson-Roy, talk about seeds and the results of the report in this Boiling Point podcast on Sydney’s Eastside 89.7FM. The report highlights issues in the native seed industry which must be overcome to ensure that seed-based restoration is more successful and sustainable into the future. Listen here.

New video on ANPC’s Translocation Guidelines

New video on ANPC’s Translocation Guidelines

Hear from the ANPC’s Dr Lucy Commander on our Guidelines for the Translocation of Threatened Plants in Australia in this video produced by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub. “The translocation guidelines help fight plant extinction because they are providing up to date information on all facets of translocation to ensure successful outcomes”. The 3rd edition of the Guidelines for the Translocation of Threatened Plants in Australia provides a step by step guide for plant translocation and is a must-have for anybody involved in plant translocation. To watch click here.

New project! ‘Prevent Rare Plant Extinction and Reduce Impacts of Future Fires’

New project! ‘Prevent Rare Plant Extinction and Reduce Impacts of Future Fires’

The ANPC is about to receive funding from San Diego Zoo Global (SDZG), with encouragement from the US Center for Plant Conservation, to prevent rare plant extinction and reduce impacts of future fires in eastern Australia. Narrow-range endemics and priority threatened plant species most sensitive to having recovery disrupted by repeated fires in the near future will be identified. Field inspections will quantify recovery and identify threats that need amelioration. Seed and/or vegetative germplasm will be collected and established at regional botanic gardens.
Working with experts, land managers, indigenous consultants, and fire management authorities, we will assess fire regimes and impacted plant species, and develop a document ‘Fire Regimes That Cause Biodiversity Decline’ and web tools designed to provide guidance on recovery actions and build the resilience of biota to future fires. Local research scientists and contractual field scientists will conduct on the ground assessments that can inform the habitat-specific guidance plan. Promotional materials and web-based interactive tools will be created to guide community thinking and actions in post-fire landscape management. Draft strategies for at least 10 species will be developed to protect them from future fires and other threats during their sensitive recovery phases. Read more.
New project! ‘Plants Going Places – capacity building in the translocation of threatened native plants in Victoria’

New project! ‘Plants Going Places – capacity building in the translocation of threatened native plants in Victoria’

The ANPC is excited to announce we have received a grant from the Ross Trust for two years from June 2020. The grant will address the need to educate and inform both environmental scientists and practitioners on the translocation of threatened plants, for the benefit of Victoria’s threatened plant species. Over the next two years, the project will present three, one-day plant translocation workshops in Melbourne, Ballarat and Bairnsdale, and produce three video site tours with accompanying public podcasts which will explore the stories of past and current translocation projects through the eyes of practitioners to investigate “What makes a translocation successful?”. The aim is to significantly build capacity to successfully undertake translocations in Victoria (especially critical to post-fire recovery), increase awareness of threatened plants, help tackle ‘plant blindness’, and give voice to those people who work in this underappreciated field. Read more.